Chawa Lilith Stays Original on Euphonious EP

By Deuce

Ever wondered what the dawning of time sounded like? Or, even better, what it must’ve looked like? Then check out track number 2 on Chawa Lilith’s forthcoming EP Euphonious, which drops December 14 to shed light on both of those ancient developments.

Seriously, the aforementioned “You Are Loved” is decidedly primal in its feel and appeal but, for that matter, so is the rest of this collection of songs. However, something about the texture of the synths in “Loved”, or the colors evoked by the sprinkle of keyboards that dot the tune from time to time, are reminiscent of the first vermillion shades to spread across anything when old man father time was coming out the womb—were such a thing possible.

However, as the name of this project signifies (as well as that of the artist; just peep her last name again) Chawa is dealing with some fairly heavy themes in her music. The tunes are far from lighthearted and are more transcendent in their composition and production. There’s also a marked deviation from the conventional songwriting formula of verse, hook, verse, hook, bridge, closeout.

In fact, a good part of most of these songs are even devoid of lyrics altogether. Instead, the singer usually finds some pleasing sound (on “Good Things” it’s ‘ho’, on “Loved” it’s ‘hooh’, “Miracles” it’s ‘hah’, you get the point) and repeats it while varying her timber and tonality to produce original renditions of each one.

She eventually works in words into almost all of these numbers, however. Still, they’re almost superfluous after her buildup of chanting, scatting, or simply improvising her way around song structure.

The effect is a decidedly otherworldly, almost supernal feel that would be good for getting in tune with nature, one’s self, or perhaps just the universe. Most of the cuts don’t have any drums or percussion, though there are a few percussive sounds scattered at random throughout “Miracles” to help keep the pace lively.

But these are the sort of songs one could hear playing in the background while a church or synagogue respectfully fills up with silent people. It’s certainly a break from the norm, rife with sounds reminiscent of Gregorian Monk chanting, and original in its presentation. 

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